Makin' sweet music

Music production techniques

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darlo
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Makin' sweet music

Post by darlo » Mon 06 Feb, 2006 7:45 pm

Hi yall,

Time for one of darlo's isn't that obvious!!! questions again. This time it's about composition as a whole.

When creating do you set out to make a track or do you just mess around and think that sounds good I'll save that for later?

This leads on to my second question to you create a track from start to finish in the one project or do you bring in parts that you have tucked away for a later date?

I think I need to change my approach to music as I'm getting tooo frustraited at the moment. I need to move away from the attitude of : right today I'm gonna make a blah track and feel utterly pissed when surpisingly it aint happened.:wink:

I think a more modular approach is needed just have a mess about and see what happens and If I like it save it away for later.

Ideas, thoughs on the approach and how do you do it?? 8)

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Post by mattbirdfootball » Tue 19 Sep, 2006 9:08 pm

This is an interesting point Darlo.
I wanted to bring up something similar with Mark actually.
I read an interview with Luke Vibert and he basically does loads of quick ideas (whether they be melodies, baselines, what have you) and goes back later to see whats worth keeping, what fits, etc. Also, I seem to remember Public Enemy used to record themselves doing some insane jamming and then loop the bits they liked - random obviously but I bet some lovely stuff can come from this method. I wonder how Mark and Tom work. Do they come up with a baseline and apply a melody to it or the other way round? Or something different? Actually, it must be far less rigid than that. I think if you do it for a living (although you cant really describe it like that because it is such an emotional thing) your doing it whenever inspiration comes. I wanted to ask Mark / Tom - anybody really - do you believe musical talant can be learned? Or are you born with it? Or maybe you have to get into it at an early age (early teens or something) and be really inspired to go create like Mark was listening to early Detroit. Maybe a combination of natural talent and years of experience / knowledge allows the likes of Mark / Tom to say 'Right, a lovely deep house track today I think' and they will likely get a lot closer to their original idea than if you or me tried. You shouldnt beat yourself up over your musical ability Darlo, you have nothing to worry about - you have the ideas, ive heard them.
Cheers, MB.

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Post by darlo » Wed 20 Sep, 2006 7:00 am

I have a theory that most of the people who become sucessful were on the dole or had part time job or are insomniacs :P.

That's how they learnt their art and how kit works inside out. They just sat there day after day experimenting.

May be a stereotypical view????

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Post by mattbirdfootball » Wed 20 Sep, 2006 9:20 pm

I dont think thats stereotypical - if your obsessed enough, you will sit there hour after hour, day after day getting to know kit, making crazy noises etc.
I dont know about you, but I get so bored of listening to my own tracks when making them (as you have to constantly listen to the same baselines, melodies over and over, tweaking them) that my boredom tolerance rises above my enthusiasm and I have to stop. Do you know what I mean? Mister Guests advice of keeping it simple is great advice!

mista guest

Post by mista guest » Thu 21 Sep, 2006 1:12 am

Knowing music, is like knowing a language. You learn (through life) how it's spoke, how it's pronounced, how the impact of even it's most littlest words, can have absolute profound effects on people. Making a great record, is like looking into your partner's eyes, and telling them that you absolutely adore the ground they walk on. It's that feeling - like no other, that just elevates people into somewhere else. Music must be learned, and practiced, and above all - felt. You have to feel it; if you don't, it's over! You feel it walking down the road, songs and pieces flowing through your mind, as your mind builds and remixes everything it can think off. I love Damian Lazarus (he's my favorite DJ right now), and he said that there's new music coming out, music that is so serious in it's structure and goal, that it makes him realise the sheer power of melody & rhythm, and harmony and everything else. I listen to his music, and I get it! I get what he's exactly saying. I know, right down to the letter what that means - and I absolutely love it!
Music is absolutely amasing!

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Post by darlo » Thu 21 Sep, 2006 6:37 am

It's that feeling - like no other, that just elevates people into somewhere else. Music must be learned, and practiced, and above all - felt. You have to feel it; if you don't, it's over! You feel it walking down the road, songs and pieces flowing through your mind, as your mind builds and remixes everything it can think off.
Are we on about music or the force? O mister :P

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